2020 Virtual LLVM Developers' Meeting - Call for presentations!

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2020 Virtual LLVM Developers' Meeting - Call for presentations!

Vassil Vassilev via cfe-dev
All developers and users of LLVM and related sub-projects are invited to present at the first virtual 2020 LLVM Developers’ Meeting!

We are looking for the following proposals:
  1. Technical Talks (25-30 minutes including Q&A):
Talks on:
  • LLVM Infrastructure,Clang and all related sub-projects
  • On uses of LLVM in academia or industry
  • On new projects using Clang or LLVM
  1. Tutorials (60 minutes)
In depth talks on LLVM infrastructure or other core libraries, tools, etc. Demos encouraged.
  1. Student Research Competition Technical Talks & Poster (20-25 minutes including Q&A)
Talks from students using LLVM, Clang, and all sub-projects in research.
The audience usually votes on a winner.
  1. Lightning Talks (5 minutes, no questions, no discussions)
Quick talks about a use or improvement of LLVM and other sub-projects.
  1. Birds of a Feather (30 minutes)
Historically these are informal and ad-hoc, but at our meeting they are prepared in advance and are guided discussions (usually with a slide deck) about a specific topic. For informal and ad-hoc, please consider a Round Table (details to come). 
  1. Panels (30-60 minutes)
Panels may discuss any topic as long as it’s relevant to LLVM or related sub-projects. Panels can take many forms, but a common format is to begin with short introductions from each panel member, and follow with an interactive dialogue among the panelists and audience members. Panels should consist of at least 3 people and have a moderator.
  1. Posters (1 hour session)
Posters presenting work using LLVM and related subprojects. Poster presenters will answer questions from attendees and give mini presentations. 

As this conference is virtual and our very first, we are still working out the numerous details. The length of the talk types below are subject to change, but the above gives you an idea of what we expect. The majority of the talks will be pre-recorded except for panels, birds of a feather, posters, and possibly lightning talks.  In addition, we will be requiring most speakers to participate in some form of live Q&A. Time zones are a huge challenge with a virtual conference and we will do our best to be reasonable in our expectations. 

The timeframe for submission is also much tighter due to allowing time for speakers to record and us to process videos. We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Submission Requirements:
The submission deadline is July 15, 2020 at 11:59PM PDT.

Please submit your proposal here:

For each proposal, please submit a title, short abstract, submission type, abstract for the website, include who the speakers or panel member/moderators are, and provide a more detailed description of the talk through an extended PDF abstract. We highly recommend you consult and follow the guide at the end of this CFP when submitting your proposal.

FAQ

When will I be notified of acceptance?

Our goal is to notify all submissions by July 31, 2020.

When is the conference?

In order to not conflict with another large virtual conference, we have moved the 2020 LLVM Developers’ Meeting to October 6-8. The exact times of the conference are still under discussion.

Should I register if I have submitted a proposal?

Given this is a virtual conference and we have less space restrictions and a different fee structure, you can register at any time before the registration deadline. We will be providing details on registration in July. 

When will the recordings be due?

Recordings should be completed by September 14.

Will I be required to have a video camera?

We do not want the lack of recording equipment to prevent submissions and will be sorting out options to help those without recording equipment available. Please stay tuned for details. 

When will my live Q&A be?

As the conference is virtual, our attendees and speakers will be in many different time zones. We won’t know the program until closer to the event and then we can start to form a schedule. Our schedule will attempt to meet the needs of many time zones, but will not be a perfect solution. You may be asked to give a live Q&A early in the morning, late at night, or multiple times. 

Who is on the program committee?

The program committee is composed of active developers of the LLVM, Clang, and related sub-communities. The website will be updated with the list of the program committee members.

I have a question, who do I contact?

Please email the LLVM Dev Mtg Organizers ([hidden email]), or the LLVM Developers’ Meeting mailing list. http://lists.llvm.org/mailman/listinfo/llvm-devmeeting


Detailed guidance on writing a proposal for the LLVM Developers’ Meeting

Writing a proposal for the LLVM Developers’ Meeting

This document is a guide to help you submit the best proposal and increase your chances of your proposal being accepted. The LLVM Developers’ Meeting program committee receives more proposals than can be accepted, so please read this guide carefully.

If you have never presented at an LLVM Developers’ Meeting, then do not fear this process. We are actively looking for new speakers who are excited about LLVM and helping grow the community through these educational talks! You do not need to be a long time developer to submit a proposal.

General Guidelines:
  • It should be clear from your abstract what your topic is, who your targeted audience is, and what are the takeaways for attendees. The program committee gets a lot of proposals and does not have time to read 10 page papers for each submission (excluding SRC submissions).
  • Talks about a use of LLVM (etc) should include details about how LLVM is used and not only be about the resulting application.
  • Tutorials on “how to use X” in LLVM (or other subproject) are greatly desired and beneficial to many developers. Entry level topics are encouraged as well.
  • Talks that have been presented at other technical conferences tend to not get accepted. If you have presented this topic before, make it clear what is new and different in your talk.


Technical Talk and SRC Talk  Proposal Template:
** Include in the extended abstract PDF attachment **

Title:
  • This will be displayed on the website, schedule, and signs. Keep it short and catchy to attract attendees to your talks. A couple of examples are “WebAssembly: Here Be Dragons” or “Beyond Sanitizers: guided fuzzing and security hardening”. There is also a field in the submission form for this same title.

Description:
  • 1-2 paragraphs. You can also use this for the Website Abstract field in the submission form.
  • We suggest you proof read and pay attention to grammar.

Details:
  • Here you can include more details about your talk. An outline, demo description, background of the speaker, etc. 1-2 paragraphs is usually sufficient.
  • This section will not be published and is intended for the PC to better understand how interesting your talk will be to the audience. For example, if you would prefer not to reveal some conclusions in the published abstract, explaining them here ensures that the PC can take them into account when evaluating your proposal.

SRC Paper:
  • If this is an SRC talk, please attach your paper as well.

Panel Talk Proposal Template:
** Include in the extended abstract PDF attachment **

Title:
  • This will be displayed on the website, schedule, and signs. These tend to be very straight forward about the area being discussed. An example is “Future directions and features for LLDB”. There is also a field in the submission form for this same title.

Description:
  • 1-2 paragraphs. May also be used for the website abstract field in the submission form.
  • Provide some talking points or potential subtopics.
  • We suggest you proof read and pay attention to grammar.

Details:
  • Provide additional details: goals of the panel, and example questions. Panels are to brainstorm and discuss ideas on a specific topic between the experts on the panel and the audience. You should also include detailed 2-3 sentence bios for each speaker on the panel. You may or may not include speaker names as the submissions are blind.

Tutorial Proposal Template:
** Include in the extended abstract PDF attachment **

Title:
  • This will be displayed on the website, schedule, and signs. Keep it short and catchy to attract attendees to your talks. There is also a field in the submission form for this same title.

Description:
  • 1-2 paragraphs. May also be used for the website abstract field in the submission form.
  • We suggest you proof read and pay attention to grammar.

Details:
  • Include additional details such as tutorial outline, what materials you will provide attendees, etc.


_______________________________________________
cfe-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.llvm.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/cfe-dev
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Re: 2020 Virtual LLVM Developers' Meeting - Call for presentations! (deadline EXTENDED)

Vassil Vassilev via cfe-dev
The deadline has been extended until July 20 11:59PM PDT.

Thanks,
Tanya

On Jun 12, 2020, at 9:15 AM, Tanya Lattner <[hidden email]> wrote:

All developers and users of LLVM and related sub-projects are invited to present at the first virtual 2020 LLVM Developers’ Meeting!

We are looking for the following proposals:
  1. Technical Talks (25-30 minutes including Q&A):
Talks on:
  • LLVM Infrastructure,Clang and all related sub-projects
  • On uses of LLVM in academia or industry
  • On new projects using Clang or LLVM
  1. Tutorials (60 minutes)
In depth talks on LLVM infrastructure or other core libraries, tools, etc. Demos encouraged.
  1. Student Research Competition Technical Talks & Poster (20-25 minutes including Q&A)
Talks from students using LLVM, Clang, and all sub-projects in research.
The audience usually votes on a winner.
  1. Lightning Talks (5 minutes, no questions, no discussions)
Quick talks about a use or improvement of LLVM and other sub-projects.
  1. Birds of a Feather (30 minutes)
Historically these are informal and ad-hoc, but at our meeting they are prepared in advance and are guided discussions (usually with a slide deck) about a specific topic. For informal and ad-hoc, please consider a Round Table (details to come). 
  1. Panels (30-60 minutes)
Panels may discuss any topic as long as it’s relevant to LLVM or related sub-projects. Panels can take many forms, but a common format is to begin with short introductions from each panel member, and follow with an interactive dialogue among the panelists and audience members. Panels should consist of at least 3 people and have a moderator.
  1. Posters (1 hour session)
Posters presenting work using LLVM and related subprojects. Poster presenters will answer questions from attendees and give mini presentations. 

As this conference is virtual and our very first, we are still working out the numerous details. The length of the talk types below are subject to change, but the above gives you an idea of what we expect. The majority of the talks will be pre-recorded except for panels, birds of a feather, posters, and possibly lightning talks.  In addition, we will be requiring most speakers to participate in some form of live Q&A. Time zones are a huge challenge with a virtual conference and we will do our best to be reasonable in our expectations. 

The timeframe for submission is also much tighter due to allowing time for speakers to record and us to process videos. We apologize for the inconvenience. 

Submission Requirements:
The submission deadline is July 15, 2020 at 11:59PM PDT.

Please submit your proposal here:

For each proposal, please submit a title, short abstract, submission type, abstract for the website, include who the speakers or panel member/moderators are, and provide a more detailed description of the talk through an extended PDF abstract. We highly recommend you consult and follow the guide at the end of this CFP when submitting your proposal.

FAQ

When will I be notified of acceptance?

Our goal is to notify all submissions by July 31, 2020.

When is the conference?

In order to not conflict with another large virtual conference, we have moved the 2020 LLVM Developers’ Meeting to October 6-8. The exact times of the conference are still under discussion.

Should I register if I have submitted a proposal?

Given this is a virtual conference and we have less space restrictions and a different fee structure, you can register at any time before the registration deadline. We will be providing details on registration in July. 

When will the recordings be due?

Recordings should be completed by September 14.

Will I be required to have a video camera?

We do not want the lack of recording equipment to prevent submissions and will be sorting out options to help those without recording equipment available. Please stay tuned for details. 

When will my live Q&A be?

As the conference is virtual, our attendees and speakers will be in many different time zones. We won’t know the program until closer to the event and then we can start to form a schedule. Our schedule will attempt to meet the needs of many time zones, but will not be a perfect solution. You may be asked to give a live Q&A early in the morning, late at night, or multiple times. 

Who is on the program committee?

The program committee is composed of active developers of the LLVM, Clang, and related sub-communities. The website will be updated with the list of the program committee members.

I have a question, who do I contact?

Please email the LLVM Dev Mtg Organizers ([hidden email]), or the LLVM Developers’ Meeting mailing list. http://lists.llvm.org/mailman/listinfo/llvm-devmeeting


Detailed guidance on writing a proposal for the LLVM Developers’ Meeting

Writing a proposal for the LLVM Developers’ Meeting

This document is a guide to help you submit the best proposal and increase your chances of your proposal being accepted. The LLVM Developers’ Meeting program committee receives more proposals than can be accepted, so please read this guide carefully.

If you have never presented at an LLVM Developers’ Meeting, then do not fear this process. We are actively looking for new speakers who are excited about LLVM and helping grow the community through these educational talks! You do not need to be a long time developer to submit a proposal.

General Guidelines:
  • It should be clear from your abstract what your topic is, who your targeted audience is, and what are the takeaways for attendees. The program committee gets a lot of proposals and does not have time to read 10 page papers for each submission (excluding SRC submissions).
  • Talks about a use of LLVM (etc) should include details about how LLVM is used and not only be about the resulting application.
  • Tutorials on “how to use X” in LLVM (or other subproject) are greatly desired and beneficial to many developers. Entry level topics are encouraged as well.
  • Talks that have been presented at other technical conferences tend to not get accepted. If you have presented this topic before, make it clear what is new and different in your talk.


Technical Talk and SRC Talk  Proposal Template:
** Include in the extended abstract PDF attachment **

Title:
  • This will be displayed on the website, schedule, and signs. Keep it short and catchy to attract attendees to your talks. A couple of examples are “WebAssembly: Here Be Dragons” or “Beyond Sanitizers: guided fuzzing and security hardening”. There is also a field in the submission form for this same title.

Description:
  • 1-2 paragraphs. You can also use this for the Website Abstract field in the submission form.
  • We suggest you proof read and pay attention to grammar.

Details:
  • Here you can include more details about your talk. An outline, demo description, background of the speaker, etc. 1-2 paragraphs is usually sufficient.
  • This section will not be published and is intended for the PC to better understand how interesting your talk will be to the audience. For example, if you would prefer not to reveal some conclusions in the published abstract, explaining them here ensures that the PC can take them into account when evaluating your proposal.

SRC Paper:
  • If this is an SRC talk, please attach your paper as well.

Panel Talk Proposal Template:
** Include in the extended abstract PDF attachment **

Title:
  • This will be displayed on the website, schedule, and signs. These tend to be very straight forward about the area being discussed. An example is “Future directions and features for LLDB”. There is also a field in the submission form for this same title.

Description:
  • 1-2 paragraphs. May also be used for the website abstract field in the submission form.
  • Provide some talking points or potential subtopics.
  • We suggest you proof read and pay attention to grammar.

Details:
  • Provide additional details: goals of the panel, and example questions. Panels are to brainstorm and discuss ideas on a specific topic between the experts on the panel and the audience. You should also include detailed 2-3 sentence bios for each speaker on the panel. You may or may not include speaker names as the submissions are blind.

Tutorial Proposal Template:
** Include in the extended abstract PDF attachment **

Title:
  • This will be displayed on the website, schedule, and signs. Keep it short and catchy to attract attendees to your talks. There is also a field in the submission form for this same title.

Description:
  • 1-2 paragraphs. May also be used for the website abstract field in the submission form.
  • We suggest you proof read and pay attention to grammar.

Details:
  • Include additional details such as tutorial outline, what materials you will provide attendees, etc.



_______________________________________________
cfe-dev mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.llvm.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/cfe-dev